Tag: USCIS interview

Marriage-Based Green Card Interview Victory – Awesome Interview #1

Marriage-Based Green Card Interview Victories and Horror StoriesThe interview is a critical part of your USCIS immigration application, if your case requires an interview. Being represented by an attorney at the interview sometimes makes the difference between winning and losing your case. 

(This exact interview scenario happens often!) Cambridge Immigration Law prepares amazing application packages for our clients because we know that a USCIS will look at the application package at least for a few minutes before calling the applicants into the interview. When that USCIS Officer sees a clear, well-documented application that addresses all legal and factual aspects of a case, the Officer can start the interview with approval in mind. In fact, many times when my clients and I have entered the interview room, the USCIS Officer says, “I’ve looked at the case. I’m going to approve it. I just need to ask a few questions.” I have been in and out of even marriage-based interview in less than 10 minutes with approvals!

If you need to talk to an experienced immigration attorney. We’ve helped hundreds of people traverse the complicated immigration and citizenship process. We would love to help you as well.  Call (617-272-7980) or email hello@cambridgeimmigrationlaw.com to get in touch.

Does having an attorney at your Marriage-Based Green Card USCIS Interview make your case look suspicious?

Does having an attorney at your Marriage-Based Green Card Interview make your case look suspiciousAbsolutely not! Having a good attorney makes you look, and actually be, prepared for your USCIS interview. 

Before the interview, your attorney should do the following:

  1. Provide you with a copy of your application and ask you to carefully review it for updates and edits (mistakes)
  2. Provide you with a list of common interview-questions that you can review and practice with your spouse
  3. Meet with you for about 60 minutes to review any updates/edits and conduct a mock interview with you and your spouse
  4. Assess why your case may have been scheduled for an interview (since most cases are not schedule for interview, as of fall 2023) and prepare explanations and documentation that will address the potential weaknesses/problems in your case
  5. Provide you with a check-list of documents that you need to provide to the attorney or bring with you to the interview

If your attorney is not taking those steps to prepare you for the USCIS interview, then your attorney is not doing his/her job and you should consider hiring a new attorney to represent you at your interview. 

During the interview, your attorney should take thorough notes of the officer’s questions and your answers, provide documents that they officer cannot find, provide explanations of your immigration history, criminal history, and any legal issues in the case, push back on the officer if s/he is asking inappropriate or irrelevant questions or badgering you or your spouse, and/or speak with a USCIS supervisor if the officer is not appropriate or does not give a decision on the day of the interview. The attorney should explain that the best way to get information from the spouses is in person, and that USCIS should take the opportunity that day to obtain information from the couple that they need. Also, you or your attorney should suggest that USCIS call the people who wrote letters of support for you in order to confirm the testimony that they provided in their letters. 

 

If you need to talk to an experienced immigration attorney. We’ve helped hundreds of people traverse the complicated immigration and citizenship process. We would love to help you as well.  Call (617-272-7980) or email hello@cambridgeimmigrationlaw.com to get in touch.

When will you get a decision after your Marriage-Based Green Card Interview?

When will you get a decision after your Marriage-Based Green Card InterviewYour USCIS officer may give you a decision while you are at the interview. However, there is no requirement for USCIS to give you a decision on the day of the interview. If you do not get a decision at the time of the interview, you (or your attorney) should ask to speak with a supervisor and then advocate to the supervisor for a decision on that day. 

After speaking with a supervisor, it may be clear that no decision will be made that day, then you should ask the officer when s/he plans to make a decision. Usually you will get a decision within a few days of an interview. If you do not receive anything from USCIS within 30 days of the interview, then you should contact USCIS (online) to request a copy of the approval notice. USCIS Boston states that decisions will come within 6 months, but in our experience, it is completely out of the norm if a case takes longer than a week to receive a decision. 

You can check the status of your case online at USCIS.gov at “Case Status”  using the receipt number on your USCIS notices. Usually you will see updates after the interview explaining if the case is under review, approved, or denied, or if a request for evidence has been issued, or if the green card is in production or already in the mail.

 

If you need to talk to an experienced immigration attorney. We’ve helped hundreds of people traverse the complicated immigration and citizenship process. We would love to help you as well.  Call (617-272-7980) or email hello@cambridgeimmigrationlaw.com to get in touch.

Will I need to go to an interview?

interviewHistorically all marriage-based green card applicants were required to attend a USCIS interview to talk about their relationship and eligibility for a green card. Recently, I learned that USCIS is approving some marriage-based green card applications without an interview. However, I have never had this happen in my cases. At this point, you should plan that you’ll have a USCIS interview if you file a marriage-based green card interview. 

For other case types, such as a green card for the parent of an adult US citizen, most of my cases do not have interviews. Also, many employment-based green card cases are approved without an interview.

If you need to talk to an experienced immigration attorney. We’ve helped hundreds of people traverse the complicated immigration and citizenship process. We would love to help you as well.  Call 617-676-0503 or email hello@cambridgeimmigrationlaw.com to get in touch

How can I prepare for my USCIS interview?

Uscis interviewGoing to a USCIS interview might be nerve-racking for some people. We will help you! Preparing clients for their marriage-based green card interviews or  any USCIS interview ends up being a lot of fun. (Really!) You get to stroll down memory lane with your partner, remembering your story, brushing up on details of your history, and getting ready to present your story in words and on paper. To get you ready, we usually meet with our client once or twice for about 60 minutes. We make sure you feel as calm, confident, and excited as possible as you head into your USCIS interview. 

We prepare clients for other types of interviews as well, including US citizenship interviews and green cards not based on marriage. For those cases, too, our team works with you so that you are calm, confident, and excited as you head into your USCIS interview.

If you need to talk to an experienced immigration attorney. We’ve helped hundreds of couples traverse the complicated immigration and citizenship process. We would love to help you as well.  Call 617-744-7919 or email hello@cambridgeimmigrationlaw.com to get in touch.

Green card approval without USCIS interview?

 

Yesterday, the American Immigration Lawyers Association reported that based on a survey of AILA members, it appears that in some cases USCIS is approving some family-based and employment-based green cards without an interview. Interviews, which are normally a requirement for most green-card cases, cannot be conducted until at least May 4 because USCIS is closed due to COVID. Waiving the interview requirement would be tremendously helpful to applicants awaiting decisions on their cases. Further, waiving the requirement will help USCIS reduce the backlog that it will inevitably face once USCIS re-open for in-person business.

If you have questions about this issue, please contact my office to set up a consultation.

USCIS Obtains “Admissions” to Marijuana Use during USCIS Interviews

Use, possession, sale and other activities relating to marijuana/cannabis are legal in many states in the United States and in other places worldwide. However, all marijuana activities (with very limited scientific research exceptions) are illegal under US federal law and in turn under US immigration law.

Non-US citizens using marijuana and/or involved in legal cannabis activities throughout the US put themselves at risk of being found inadmissible to the US (that is, unable to enter the US), removable from the US (that is, deportable), and/or ineligible for US citizenship. Some immigration issues arise only when a person has a criminal conviction for marijuana related crimes; other immigration arise merely when a person admits to crimes related to marijuana use. Other immigration issues arise merely when a US immigration officer has “reason to believe” that a person is involved in marijuana trafficking (and trafficking can be as simple as a state law relating to intent to distribute).

In USCIS in Seattle and Denver, USCIS officers are asking enough questions in immigration interviews to elicit “admissions” to marijuana crimes, rendering immigrant ineligible for certain immigration benefits and in some cases, deportable.

AILA issued the Practice Pointer below discussing this issue.

If you use or have used marijuana in the past and are NOT a US-citizen, you should speak with an experienced immigration attorney about the potential consequences on your current or future immigration status.

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Marriage-Based Green Card Document Guide

We work hard to make your immigration case easy for you. Use this easy guide to help you organize the documents that you would use if you are eligible to submit an application for a marriage-based green card application. You should consult with an attorney to figure out if you are eligible for a green card before you submit any applications or documents to the U.S. government.