Tag: preparation

Document Preparation Checklist for EOIR Proceedings

Preparing for EOIR proceedings involves organizing and presenting various documents to support your case effectively. Use this handy checklist to ensure your documents are pre-organized and ready for submission during your hearings.

Personal Documents

  • Identification: Valid government-issued photo ID (e.g., passport, driver’s license). *
  • Immigration Documents: Copies of visa, green card, work permit (EAD), and any other immigration-related documents. *

Evidence of Eligibility for Relief

  • Marriage-Based Green Card: Marriage certificate, evidence of bona fide marriage (photos, joint financial documents, affidavits from family and friends).
  • Asylum Application: Personal statement detailing reasons for seeking asylum, supporting documentation (e.g., country condition reports, news articles).
  • Cancellation of Removal: Proof of physical presence in the U.S. for the required period, evidence of hardship to qualifying relatives.

Witness Statements

  • Affidavits: Sworn statements from witnesses supporting your case (e.g., family members, friends, employers).
  • Contact Information: Contact details of witnesses for verification if necessary.

Country Condition Reports

  • Relevant Reports: Copies of country condition reports or human rights documentation supporting your claim for asylum or for a waiver.

Financial Documents

  • Tax Returns: Copies of recent tax transcripts to demonstrate financial stability and compliance.
  • Bank Statements: Recent bank statements showing financial transactions and stability.

Additional Documents

  • Medical Records: If relevant to your case, copies of medical records or reports supporting your claims.
  • Criminal Records: Copies of any relevant criminal records or police reports (if applicable). *
  • Affidavits of Support: If sponsoring a family member for immigration purposes, completed Form I-864.

Legal Representation

  • Attorney’s Contact Information: Contact details of your immigration attorney for representation during proceedings.

Miscellaneous

  • EOIR Practice Manual: Follow the court’s instruction for the required documents, format, and deadlines for your case type.
  • Copies: Ensure you have multiple copies of all documents for submission to the court and opposing counsel.
  • Organization: Arrange documents in a logical order (or required order in practice manual) for easy reference during hearings.

Conclusion

This document preparation checklist will help you prepare your documents for your EOIR case. Thorough preparation and organization can significantly contribute to the success of your case in immigration court.

* In some cases, it may be in your best interest not to provide certain ID or criminal documents, thus requiring the U.S. government to prove certain facts about you.

$10 million in Grants to Fund Citizenship Preparation Services

USCIS recently funded many community-based organizations that help permanent residents prepare and apply for U.S. citizenship. Look at the information at the USCIS website to see where you may be able to get low-cost or free legal services relating to naturalization. In Boston, Massachusetts, the Irish International Immigrant Center is one of the organizations that recently received funding. Also, look at  Citizenship Resources to use web resources to learn more about the N-400 Application for Naturalization.

If you have complications (such as criminal convictions, tax issues, or lengthy periods of time outside of the US), you should consult with an immigration attorney about your eligibility for US citizenship. I have helped many LPRs with legal complications win citizenship, and I may be able to help you too.

Please visit Citizenship Resources to use web resources that provide learning materials to help permanent residents prepare for the naturalization process.

Free Guides and Resources!

Marriage-Based Green Card Guides

We work hard to make your immigration case easy for you. Use these easy guides to help you organize your documents.

You should consult with an attorney to figure out if you are eligible for a green card before you submit any applications or documents to the U.S. government.